Cool Article Contest Images

A few nice article contest images I found:

Cool Article Contest Images

Polish girls, semi-finalists in “Miss Century of Progress” contest
Cool Article Contest Images
Image by UIC Library Digital Collections
Description: Five Polish girls selected to appear in the semi-finals of the Miss Century of Progress beauty contest Saturday night: Helen Zadora, 11440 Stephenson; Loretta Gondek, 2135 Webster; Sylvia Lopacinski, 4457 South Sawyer; Irene Napientek, 3350 Diversey; Casmina Tryjefaczka, 4629 South Honore.
Photographer: Kaufmann & Fabry Co.
Contributors: Century of Progress International Exposition
Date: ca. 1933-1934

Cool Article Contest Images

Identifier: COP_17_0002_00056_001
Format: 7.5”x9.5”
Type: Photograph

Cool Article Contest Images

Source: Century of Progress records
Collection: Century of Progress World’s Fair, 1933-1934 (University of Illinois at Chicago)
Repository: Special Collections and University Archives, University of Illinois at Chicago Library

Cool Article Contest Images

Rights: This image may be used freely, with attribution, for research, study and educational purposes. For permission to publish, distribute, or use this image for any other purpose, please contact Special Collections and University Archives, University of Illinois at Chicago Library, 801 South Morgan St., Chicago, IL 60607. Phone: (312) 996-2742; email: [email protected]

Cool Article Contest Images

Request a reproduction: library.uic.edu/help/article/1922/obtain-high-quality-ima…

Cool Article Contest Images

Sponsorship: Funded by a Library Services and Technology Act (LSTA) grant awarded by the Illinois State Library under Jesse White; Secretary of State.

Reference URL: collections.carli.illinois.edu/u?/uic_cop,556

Best of EP Guest Photographer May: “Passing the village church ” – Olaf Simons
article contest - Cool Article Contest Images
Image by European Parliament
Photographer

Description of the photo
I joined my wife who is registered here. We get up Angergasse (the road that
leads to the village meadow, so the translation), we pass the village church with the 1914 memorial sticking out. Polling is in the local restaurant which has a special room for celebrations, filled with chairs – and on days like this the two polling booths. In the dark we can hardly see the committee that organises the vote. You can also look behind walls and see that people have satellite antennas. At least they can watch European TV…

Voting can be a pretty quiet activity. The images are from Essleben, Thüringen,
Germany, a remote village of 180 inhabitants – and a village at a border we have
lost more than 100 years ago: the old early modern border between Weimar and
Magdeburg lands) (that’s why there is no traffic passing through the village, a
village in the former GDR where democratic voting had to be reintroduced in the
1990s.
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Read our article about the EP Guest Photographer campaign here:

www.europarl.europa.eu/news/en/news-room/content/20140602…!

Take a look at the best images of the 5 month of our whole competition and vote ("like") your favourite one!
www.flickr.com/photos/european_parliament/sets/7215763962…

Padaung or Kayan woman.
article contest - Cool Article Contest Images
Image by Linda DV
Crossing over to Myanmar.
Visiting ethnic minority villages up north and into Karenni rebellion territory over the border (Myanmar). These pictures were not taken in Thailand, but in a Karenni rebellion army settlement in Myanmar, Kayan region. These Padaung woman were living there as refugees. In the years after that they were held hostage as a tourist attraction.

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kayan_(Myanmar)

Following article is not totally correct, since it says Padaung woman were settled in the Karenni outpost in 1985. We were there almost by accident while trekking along Karenni villages in 1984, and those woman had just arrived, so we were told. But the exploitation is very much the reality of what we saw.
In 1985, a Padaung man named Moli brought three Padaung women, in their twenties and thirties and wearing the traditional neck spirals, from a contested area in the war zone near Loikaw to the relative security of the Karenni base. The women, Mu Louma, Mu Thoo, and Mon Nee, were said to have traveled so far from their original villages under pressure from Moli. Privately, some Karenni at the headquarters said that the three had been "kidnapped" by Moli, who saw their potential as a tourist attraction for visitors near the Thai border. The women settled in at the rebel army base, staying with Padaung men who were in the Karenni army. The women told the local Karenni villagers that they would not continue the neck spiraling custom with their daughters – possibly influenced by Christian Karennis’ opposition to the practice. – See more at: www.culturalsurvival.org/ourpublications/csq/article/host…

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